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329 West 18th Street Suite #610
Chicago, Illinois 60616
(312) 243-1808
info@chicagofilmarchives.org

October 16, 2021

Chicago Home Movie Day 2021

Once again, Chicago Film Archives and the Chicago Film Society join forces to present CHICAGO HOME MOVIE DAY at the Chicago History Museum. Read More »

Location:

Chicago History Museum
go to map

Hours:

11:00-3:00

Admissions:

FREE (donations welcome!)
Saturday, October 24, 2020; Saturday, October 31, 2020

Chicago Home Movie Day 2020

This year, Chicago Film Archives presents CHICAGO HOME MOVIE DAY on CAN-TV and online. Read More »

Hours:

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Additional Information:

Two 2-hour programs airing on CAN-TV (ch. 21), and streaming on CFA's YouTube channel
Saturday, October 19, 2019

Chicago Home Movie Day 2019

Once again, Chicago Film Archives and the Chicago Film Society join forces to present CHICAGO HOME MOVIE DAY at the Chicago History Museum. Read More »

Location:

1601 N Clark St
Chicago, IL
go to map

Hours:

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Admissions:

FREE (donations always welcome!)
Saturday, October 27, 2018

Chicago Home Movie Day 2018

HMD18-image

Once again, Chicago Film Archives and the Chicago Film Society join forces to present CHICAGO HOME MOVIE DAY at the Chicago History Museum.

Home movies provide invaluable records of our families and our communities: they document vanished storefronts, questionable fashions, adorable pets, long-departed loved ones, and neighborhoods-in-transition. Many Chicagoans still possess these old reels, passed down from generation to generation, but lack the projection equipment to view them properly and safely. That’s where Home Movie Day comes in: you bring the films (16mm, 8mm and/or Super 8mm), and we inspect them, project them, and offer tips on storage, preservation, and video transfer–all free of charge.

Chicago Home Movie Day is dedicated to YOUR home movies. From 11:00am until 3:00pm archivists and projectionists will inspect and project all celluloid home movies that walk in the door. We encourage providers of these gems to introduce their films to an eager HMD audience. Don’t have any films? We’ve got you covered! In the afternoon we’ll present a special program of home movies and amateur films from CFA’s collections.

HOME MOVIE DAY FAQ:

What film formats can I bring to Home Movie Day?
We can inspect and project 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8. If you have any other oddball formats (28mm, 9.5mm, etc.), we can’t project the films for you, but we can help you find a safe, cost-effective way to view these prints. You’ll also earn our undying film nerd envy.

Do I need to bring a home movie?
Nope. You’re welcome to stop by and just watch other people’s home movies. And if you’re a walking encyclopedia of forgotten Chicago landmarks, eateries, and parades, your commentary will be much appreciated!

I have a whole box of ‘em! Can we watch ‘em all?
Nobody likes a home movie hog. Bring as many films as you’d like, but we’ll be screening one reel from each participant until everyone has had a chance to see their home movies. After that, second helpings are totally fine–especially in Kodachrome.

Do I have to get up and talk about my home movies?
You’re welcome to narrate your home movies and inform everyone that this scene was shot at Aunt Bertha’s high school graduation and that this one was shot on your family trip to Florida in 1982. Or you can just sit in the auditorium and watch them in anonymous silence. Whatever floats your celluloid boat.

My home movies are very personal. Why would I want to watch them with a bunch of voyeurs?
Home movies often commemorate scenes of enormous personal importance: weddings, graduations, birthdays, family reunions. Though home movies often begin as family records with deeply private meaning, the passage of years makes them compelling to people far beyond your immediate family. They serve as authentic records of our neighborhoods, traditions, and communities. You’ll enjoy sharing them–really.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? They’re incredibly precious to me!
Nope. We’ll just inspect and project your home movies and return them to you in comparable condition. (If there are broken perforations or cracked frames, we’ll fix those and return the films in better condition!) Keep in mind that decades-old films are fragile and there’s an inherent (though slight) risk of damage during any projection. If we do not feel that the film can be safely projected, we will not screen it.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? I don’t want ‘em anymore! (They smell funny.)
The Chicago Film Archives would be happy to discuss options for donating your old, unwanted home movies to its ever-growing collection.

This sounds amazing! How much will this expert consultation set me back?
Home Movie Day is absolutely free, but donations are welcome.

 

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HMD 2018 image designed by Lauren Caddick (www.laurencaddickdesign.com)

Location:

1601 N. Clark Street
Chicago, IL
go to map

Hours:

11AM - 3PM

Admissions:

FREE (donations always welcome!)
Saturday, October 13, 2018

Arlington Heights Home Movie Day

Print

Chicago Film Archives is excited to be partnering with the Arlington Heights Memorial Library on the presentation of the first ever Home Movie Day in Arlington Heights! CFA staff archivists will be on site to inspect and project your 8mm, Super 8mm, and 16mm films and provide advice and recommendations about how to best care for your films in the future. We’ve hosted Chicago’s Home Movie Day for over ten years and we’re thrilled to move out into the suburbs this year!

Please visit the Arlington Heights Memorial Library website for more information about the event and call 847-392-0100 or visit ahml.info to register. Signups open from Mon, 10/01/2018 – 9:00am to Sat, 10/13/2018 – 4:30pm.

Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and local history held annually at many local venues worldwide. This is an opportunity for you and your family to share your own home movies with your community and enjoy seeing their stories as well. We provide all the screening equipment, and all you need to bring is your tape or film and a story to share. Even if you don’t wish to screen anything, you can still come to enjoy the show as an audience member!

If you wish to screen a movie, please arrive by 4:30 pm to sign up for a 5-minute time slot. Limit one submission per family, but additional submissions may be screened if time allows.

If you are bringing a video, please have your tape queued up to the appropriate starting place. Only the following formats can be screened: 8mm, Super8, 16mm, VHS, VHS-C, Video8, Hi8, Betamax, DV, and MiniDV. Not sure what kind you have? We can help you identify the different film and video formats. Call us at 847-870-5222.

Stick around after the screening to hear about how to best care for your films and learn how you can convert your home movies digital video files at the library. For more information about Home Movie Day, check out their website: http://www.centerforhomemovies.org/hmd

Presented in partnership with Chicago Film Archives and Downtown Mediaworks.

Location:

500 N Dunton Ave, Arlington Heights, IL 60004
go to map

Hours:

4:30 - 7pm

Admissions:

Free!
Saturday, October 7, 2017

Chicago Home Movie Day 2017

HMD_2017

Once again, Chicago Film Archives and the Chicago Film Society join forces to present CHICAGO HOME MOVIE DAY at the Chicago History Museum.

Home movies provide invaluable records of our families and our communities: they document vanished storefronts, questionable fashions, adorable pets, long-departed loved ones, and neighborhoods-in-transition. Many Chicagoans still possess these old reels, passed down from generation to generation, but lack the projection equipment to view them properly and safely. That’s where Home Movie Day comes in: you bring the films (16mm, 8mm and/or Super 8mm), and we inspect them, project them, and offer tips on storage, preservation, and video transfer–all free of charge.

Chicago Home Movie Day is dedicated to YOUR home movies. From 11:00am until 3:00pm archivists and projectionists will inspect and project all celluloid home movies that walk in the door. We encourage providers of these gems to introduce their films to an eager HMD audience. Don’t have any films? We’ve got you covered! In the afternoon we’ll present a special program of home movies and amateur films from CFA’s collections.

Watch the trailer below!

HOME MOVIE DAY FAQ:

What film formats can I bring to Home Movie Day?
We can inspect and project 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8. If you have any other oddball formats (28mm, 9.5mm, etc.), we can’t project the films for you, but we can help you find a safe, cost-effective way to view these prints. You’ll also earn our undying film nerd envy.

Do I need to bring a home movie?
Nope. You’re welcome to stop by and just watch other people’s home movies. And if you’re a walking encyclopedia of forgotten Chicago landmarks, eateries, and parades, your commentary will be much appreciated!

I have a whole box of ‘em! Can we watch ‘em all?
Nobody likes a home movie hog. Bring as many films as you’d like, but we’ll be screening one reel from each participant until everyone has had a chance to see their home movies. After that, second helpings are totally fine–especially in Kodachrome.

Do I have to get up and talk about my home movies?
You’re welcome to narrate your home movies and inform everyone that this scene was shot at Aunt Bertha’s high school graduation and that this one was shot on your family trip to Florida in 1982. Or you can just sit in the auditorium and watch them in anonymous silence. Whatever floats your celluloid boat.

My home movies are very personal. Why would I want to watch them with a bunch of voyeurs?
Home movies often commemorate scenes of enormous personal importance: weddings, graduations, birthdays, family reunions. Though home movies often begin as family records with deeply private meaning, the passage of years makes them compelling to people far beyond your immediate family. They serve as authentic records of our neighborhoods, traditions, and communities. You’ll enjoy sharing them–really.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? They’re incredibly precious to me!
Nope. We’ll just inspect and project your home movies and return them to you in comparable condition. (If there are broken perforations or cracked frames, we’ll fix those and return the films in better condition!) Keep in mind that decades-old films are fragile and there’s an inherent (though slight) risk of damage during any projection. If we do not feel that the film can be safely projected, we will not screen it.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? I don’t want ‘em anymore! (They smell funny.)
The Chicago Film Archives would be happy to discuss options for donating your old, unwanted home movies to its ever-growing collection.

This sounds amazing! How much will this expert consultation set me back?
Home Movie Day is absolutely free, but donations are welcome.

 

Location:

1601 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL
go to map

Hours:

11AM - 3PM

Admissions:

FREE (donations always welcome!)
Saturday, October 15, 2016

Chicago Home Movie Day 2016

Once again, Chicago Film Archives and Northwest Chicago Film Society join forces to present CHICAGO HOME MOVIE DAY at the Chicago History Museum.

Home movies provide invaluable records of our families and our communities: they document vanished storefronts, questionable fashions, adorable pets, long-departed loved ones, and neighborhoods-in-transition. Many Chicagoans still possess these old reels, passed down from generation to generation, but lack the projection equipment to view them properly and safely. That’s where Home Movie Day comes in: you bring the films (16mm, 8mm and/or Super 8mm), and we inspect them, project them, and offer tips on storage, preservation, and video transfer–all free of charge.

Chicago Home Movie Day is dedicated to YOUR home movies. From 11:00am until 2:00pm archivists and projectionists will inspect and project all celluloid home movies that walk in the door. We encourage providers of these gems to introduce their films to an eager HMD audience. Don’t have any films? We’ve got you covered! In the afternoon we’ll present a special program of home movies and amateur films from CFA’s collections.

Watch the trailer below!

 

HOME MOVIE DAY FAQ:

What film formats can I bring to Home Movie Day?
We can inspect and project 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8. If you have any other oddball formats (28mm, 9.5mm, etc.), we can’t project the films for you, but we can help you find a safe, cost-effective way to view these prints. You’ll also earn our undying film nerd envy.

Do I need to bring a home movie?
Nope. You’re welcome to stop by and just watch other people’s home movies. And if you’re a walking encyclopedia of forgotten Chicago landmarks, eateries, and parades, your commentary will be much appreciated!

I have a whole box of ‘em! Can we watch ‘em all?
Nobody likes a home movie hog. Bring as many films as you’d like, but we’ll be screening one reel from each participant until everyone has had a chance to see their home movies. After that, second helpings are totally fine–especially in Kodachrome.

Do I have to get up and talk about my home movies?
You’re welcome to narrate your home movies and inform everyone that this scene was shot at Aunt Bertha’s high school graduation and that this one was shot on your family trip to Florida in 1982. Or you can just sit in the auditorium and watch them in anonymous silence. Whatever floats your celluloid boat.

My home movies are very personal. Why would I want to watch them with a bunch of voyeurs?
Home movies often commemorate scenes of enormous personal importance: weddings, graduations, birthdays, family reunions. Though home movies often begin as family records with deeply private meaning, the passage of years makes them compelling to people far beyond your immediate family. They serve as authentic records of our neighborhoods, traditions, and communities. You’ll enjoy sharing them–really.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? They’re incredibly precious to me!
Nope. We’ll just inspect and project your home movies and return them to you in comparable condition. (If there are broken perforations or cracked frames, we’ll fix those and return the films in better condition!) Keep in mind that decades-old films are fragile and there’s an inherent (though slight) risk of damage during any projection. If we do not feel that the film can be safely projected, we will not screen it.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? I don’t want ‘em anymore! (They smell funny.)
The Chicago Film Archives would be happy to discuss options for donating your old, unwanted home movies to its ever-growing collection.

This sounds amazing! How much will this expert consultation set me back?
Home Movie Day is absolutely free, but donations are welcome.

 

Location:

1601 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL
go to map

Hours:

11AM-3PM

Admissions:

FREE (donations always welcome!)

“Small gauge film is not larger than life, it’s part of life.”

This Wednesday, March 26th, we’re celebrating Home Movie Day in Chicago’s Logan Square neighborhood. Per usual, we’re inviting the community to bring their celluloid home movies (16mm, 8mm and/or Super 8mm) to have them projected in front of a live audience. Don’t have any films? Don’t fret! We also have a program of CFA home movies in store (more on that soon).

This is a very collaborative event all around. We were invited by The Post Family to help create and co-host the event. They’re a Chicago art collective with their own printmaking studio, office, and gallery space, and they’ve courageously taken over Comfort Station programming for the entire month of March (you can peek at their remaining events here). We’re also teaming up with Northwest Chicago Film Society, who will offer their wisdom & expertise by projecting these treasured celluloid films for all to see, and Logan Square International Film Series (Comfort Films), who continue to help spread the word. The Post Family has also enlisted the help of Synesthetic (Angel Elmore : piano, Joe Vajarsky : tenor saxophone, Norman Long : field recordings, Dan Godston : trumpet & Lou Ciccoteli : drums) to accompany any or all films.

JoAnn Elam in “Boyers & Rhinos,” an 8mm film from 1981

We’re using this community-fueled event as a good excuse to crack open our JoAnn Elam Collection, or more specifically, to showcase rarely screened 8mm home movies from the collection.

Just in case, some quick background:  JoAnn Elam (1949-2009) is a central figure in the history of Chicago’s experimental film community. Her short experimental and documentary films capture the spirit and ethos of a politically active, feminist, and socially conscious artist. She also happened to be a Logan Square resident, often filming her neighbors, community events, gardens, co-workers & friends with her 8mm Carena Zoomex camera.

JoAnn always thought of her films as home movies and validated them as such. These feelings were upheld in JoAnn’s “manifestette,” which she co-wrote with fellow filmmaker & friend, Chuck Kleinhans (Northwestern University, Jump Cut), for a joint show:

Small gauge film (regular 8 and Super 8 ) is low cost, technically accessible, and appropriate for small scale viewing.

Because it’s cheap and you can shoot a lot of film, filming can be flexible and spontaneous. Because the equipment is light and unobtrusive, the filming relationship can be immediate and personal.

The appropriate viewing situation is a small space with a small number of people. Therefore it invites films made for or with specific audiences. Often the filmmaker and/or people filmed are present at a screening. The filming and viewing events can be considered as part of the editing process. Editing decisions can be made before, during, and after filming and can incorporate feedback from an audience. Connections can be made between production and consumption, filmmaker and audience and subject matter.

Small gauge film is not larger than life, it’s part of life.

JoAnn Elam
Chuck Kleinhans

“Boyers & Rhinos,” 1981

The intimate Comfort Station Logan Square provides an “appropriate viewing situation” as well as a geographically meaningful space to screen JoAnn’s 8mm films. This Wednesday’s program isn’t a retrospective of JoAnn’s work, but rather a showcase of the Logan Square-centric home movies found in her collection. The selected films include scenes of Palmer Square Art Fairs, back porch lounging, a double exposed bbq and energetic black kittens. One reel, simply titled “Belden & Kimball,” documents smaller neighborhood moments – potted plants, parallel parking and youthful sidewalk shenanigans.

To compliment JoAnn’s films, we’ll also be screening very Chicago home movies from our other collections (primarily, the Rhodes Patterson Collection). These 16mm reels were all shot during or around the same time as JoAnn’s, but go beyond the neighborhood of Logan Square. Highlights include a shaky helicopter ride around the loop, a crowded lunch break at Grant Park, a trip down late 1970′s Maxwell Street Market and a panorama of Great America in 1977.

Join us from 7-9PM to celebrate home movies, small gauge cinema, Logan Square and JoAnn Elam with YOUR home movies and the following program:

-Loop Christmas (Rhodes Patterson, circa 1969, 16mm., Color, Silent, 5 min.)
-Blizzard of ’79 (JoAnn Elam, 1979, 8mm., Color, Silent, 4.5 min.)
-Helicopter Chicago Loop (Rhodes Patterson, 1973, 16mm., Color, Silent, 6 min.)
-Belden & Kimball (JoAnn Elam, circa 1977, 8mm., Color, Silent, 3 min.)
-Grant Park Frisbee (Rhodes Patterson, 1971, 16mm., Color, Silent, 4.5 min.)
-Palmer Square (JoAnn Elam, circa 1976, 8mm., Color, Silent, 13 min.)
-Apollo 11 Chicago Parade (Rhodes Patterson, 1969, 16mm., Color, Silent, 8 min.)
-Julia & Kittens (JoAnn Elam, circa 1979, 8mm., B&W, Silent, 2.5 min)
-Great America 1977 (Rhodes Patterson, 1977, 16mm., Color, Silent, 6 min.)
-Boyers & Rhinos (JoAnn Elam, circa 1981, 8mm., Color, Silent, 5 min.)
-Walls & Helen – Chicago’s Maxwell Street Market (Glick-Berolzheimer Collection, 1978, 16mm., B&W, Silent, 5 min.)
-Palmer Square Art Fair ‘85 (JoAnn Elam, 1985, 8mm., Color, Silent, 7 min.)
More here and here

 

Chicago Home Movie Day 2013 (everyone’s invited!)

CFA and Northwest Chicago Film Society have lots in store for you at this year’s home movie day, which takes place Saturday, October 19th at the accommodating Chicago History Museum. This international event (started 11 year ago by the Center for Home Movies) provides a unique opportunity for those with 16mm., 8mm, and/or Super 8mm home movies to have their films inspected and projected by local archivists and skilled projectionists.

We also have lots of entertainment for those without films to share: Home Movie Day Bingo (win prizes!), popcorn (mmmm), live accompaniment by local pianist David Drazin PLUS a selection of curated home movies from two culturally rich Chicago neighborhoods – Bronzeville and Ravenswood Manor. Why these two neighborhoods? Well, community orginzations from these two neighborhood approached CFA separately about having their own neighborhood home movie days in 2014 (Ravenswood Manor turns 100 next year, btw!!). We thought we could get a head start by featuring these two communities at our 2013 city-wide event. Of course, all Chicagoans (and their home movies!) are encouraged to attend and participate in Home Movie Day, but here’s an idea of what you’ll see in this year’s 2PM curated program:

Representing Bronzeville: The home movies of Olympic Champion & politician, Ralph Metcalfe!

Once called “the worlds fastest human,” two-time track & field Olympian Ralph Metcalfe nabbed glory in both Los Angeles in 1932 and in Berlin in 1936. While a skilled competitor in his own right, Metcalfe is likely best remembered for his part in the gold medal-winning 4×100 relay team that competed in Berlin. Following military service and a career in the private sector, Metcalfe started his political career by representing Chicago’s Third Ward on the city council in 1949. The Democrat took office in the Senate in 1971, and represented Illinois there until his death in 1978.

We are very excited to share personal home movies from the Ralph Metcalfe Collection at this year’s home movie day! Expect to see 1957 scenes from inside Chicago’s Third Ward Office, mid-century track & field events, Queen Elizabeth II’s 1959 visit to Chicago and a 1961 bake sale held at Howalton Day School, the first African American private school in Chicago. Ralph’s son, who is working tirelessly to preserve and promote his father’s legacy, will be on hand at Home Movie Day to narrate his family’s home movies.

Representing Ravenswood Manor: teenage antics shot on Super 8 sound film!

Back in the early 1970′s, a gaggle of Ravenswood Manor teens documented their wild neighborhood antics and shot chaotic short films on their Super 8mm cameras. Go back in time to an era of Yes & Pink Floyd t-shirts(!), wood-panelled basements, Chicago River explosions and unsupervised pyrotechnics.

and as a special treat, newly acquired CFA home movies of the 1933 Chicago’s World’s Fair!

CFA just acquired a collection of  home movies from the Zahn Family of Racine, Wisconsin. Included in this donation were 5 (yes, 5!) 8mm home movies shot at the 1933-1934 Chicago World’s Fair (aka the Century of Progress International Exposition). At this year’s Home Movie Day, we will project our favorite World’s Fair reels from the Zahn Collection (teaser: animatronic King Kong!!!). The 8mm film format came about in 1932, so this is an extremely rare chance to watch some of the earliest 8mm out there …

Home Movie Day 2013 is from 11AM-3PM, with the curated program beginning at 2PM. Folks with celluloid home movies should feel free to mozy on over anytime between 11AM-2PM to have their films inspected and, if in good shape, projected. For more info on the event, click over to our HMD 2013 events page. Not in Chicago? Check out the *official* and growing list of Home Movie Day locations here (via The Center for Home Movies). Happy Home Movie Day to all!