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AMERICAN REVOLUTION 2 screening and panel discussion at Rebuild Foundation – Stony Island Arts Bank

Location:

6760 South Stony Island Avenue, Chicago IL, 60649
go to map

Dates:

Friday, November 30, 2018

Hours:

7pm

Admissions:

Free

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UH5ObQ7Xpc&t

We are thrilled to be presenting our 2018 preservation project, American Revolution 2, at the Stony Island Arts Bank at 7pm on Friday, November 30th. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with Henry “Poison” Gaddis, Mike James, Hy Thurman, and Jakobi Williams.

Although American Revolution 2 begins with footage of the explosive confrontations between the Chicago police and protestors during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, the filmmakers (Howard Alk, Mike Gray, and Bill Cottle) quickly move from these clashes to focus on conversations about power, race, and resistance that were taking place in the city. The film is a nuanced, compelling, and timely examination of the unlikely relationship that was developing between the Black Power movement in Chicago and the Young Patriots, a group of impoverished, primarily white, residents of the Uptown neighborhood who were beginning to organize around issues of social mobility, police brutality, and income inequity.

This preservation project and presentation is in honor of Mike Gray and Bill Cottle of the Film Group. CFA’s friend Mike Gray passed away in 2013. The preservation of American Revolution 2 was made possible with the generous support of the National Film Preservation Foundation and Rebuild Foundation.

“A film every Chicagoan should see … as well edited and as high in technical quality as any cinema verite documentary I’ve ever seen.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

Michael James is a veteran on the 1968 Democratic Convention demonstrations and the political and cultural struggles of that era. He has received considerable notoriety regarding 1968 having been photographed rocking a police paddy wagon during events at Michigan and Balbo. A Woodrow Wilson Fellowship took him to California where he did graduate work in sociology at the University of California Berkeley 1964-66. There he was active in the Free Speech Movement and became a member of Students for a Democratic Society, later becoming a national officer of SDS. While at Berkeley he began doing community organizing in West Oakland, then moved to Chicago to work with Uptown residents, many from the South, with the organization JOIN (Jobs or Income Now) Community Union. James went on to found the organization and newspaper Rising Up Angry (1969-75). RUA was part of Chicago’s Rainbow Coalition that also included the Black Panther Party, Young Lords Organization, Young Patriots, and American Indian Movement. In the early 70′s he began teaching a course at Columbia College called Organizing for Social Change. In that class his ideas for community based economic institutions evolved, and in 1976 James co-founded the Heartland Cafe, a restaurant and community institution that serves “good wholesome food for mind and body”, and continues to be an inspirational community institution. James co hosts The Live from the Heartland Show on WLUW 88.7 fm, is a member of the board of directors of Athletes United for Peace, The Rainbow Council of Elders, and a member of the Advisory Committee of the Cornucopia Institute (an organic food and farm watchdog organization. He is past President of the Democratic Party of the 49th Ward organization and a member of the Screen Actors Guild.

Henry “Poison” Gaddis is a native of the South Side of Chicago. Gaddis began his foray into social justice activism while still a student in elementary school. At the age of nine, Gaddis led a march with A. Phillip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and 10,000 others on the 1960 Republican National Convention at the Chicago Amphitheatre to demand that a civil rights plank be included as part of the Republican Party platform. In the fall of 1968, while enrolled at Northeastern Illinois State College, Gaddis traveled to East St. Louis, IL to attend the Illinois Chapter of the NAACP State Convention. Also in attendance was the newly elected Chairman of NAACP Youth Council, Fred Hampton. As a result of this encounter and impressed by Hampton’s eloquence and world view, Gaddis agreed to join the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party (ILBPP) and served on the Chicago Central staff. He was commissioned as Foreign Service Officer in 1980 by President Jimmy Carter and went on to serve in various assignments including United States Consul to the Republic of Cote D’Ivoire. Gaddis has traveled to six continents, worked in several countries, and served as an advocate for issues affecting the African diaspora. Throughout his professional career, Gaddis has had a variety of experiences including serving as a Boy Scouts of America District Executive, Deputy Coroner of Allegheny County Pennsylvania, and as Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at Texas Southern University. He currently resides with his family in Houston, Texas and is a volunteer with the Harris County Aquatics Program.

Hy Thurman has dedicating himself to improving the lives of marginalized and oppressed people by leading them into action to control their daily existence. He began his civil rights advocacy in the 1960s when he moved to Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood, a predominately southern white community. Thurman became a community organizer and co-founder of the Young Patriots Organization, a group of displaced southern white youth. He co-founded the Original Rainbow Coalition, an interracial organization that brought together the Young Lords (a Puerto Rican gang turned political), the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, and, later, Rising Up Angry. With the assistance of the Black Panther Party, the Young Patriots created survival programs including free health clinics, breakfast for school children, free legal services, and police brutality patrols. Thurman has reformed the Young Patriots and is working to make their history widely available. His other accomplishments include: founder of Emerald City, the first drug abuse treatment program on Chicago’s north side; co-founder of the Uptown People’s Center of Northeastern Illinois University; and founder of Blues to Bluegrass, a city-wide organization that worked with musicians and artists to perform benefit programs for grassroots organizations. Thurman presently resides in Alabama where he continues the fight to liberate all poor and oppressed people.

Jakobi Williams is the Ruth N. Halls Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies and the Department of History at Indiana University-Bloomington. He was born and raised on the south side of Chicago (Englewood). Prior to joining the faculty at Indiana University, he served as an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky, an adjunct professor at UCLA, and spent one year as a Chancellor Post Doctoral Fellow at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Williams’ research interests are centered on questions of resistance and the social justice revolutions found within the historic African American community. His most recent book, From the Bullet to the Ballot: The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and Racial Coalition Politics in Chicago, was published by the University of North Carolina Press under its prestigious John Hope Franklin Series. Williams is a recipient of the National Endowment for the Humanities grant, the National Humanities Center fellowship, and the Big Ten Academic Alliance-Academic Leadership Program. He is completing two books, Neighborhoods First and Global Call of Power to the People. Both books examine the monumental impact of the Black Panther Party on non-African American groups both domestically and abroad as a model for grassroots community organizing to address disparities and disadvantages.

 

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Designed to be Seen – Creative Broadcast: Communication, Commercials, and Advertising

Location:

1601 North Clark Street, Chicago IL 60614
go to map

Dates:

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Hours:

6pm

Admissions:

Free

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still from Magazine Publishers Association “First Impression (1964)

Designed to be Seen: Art and Function in Chicago Mid-Century Film presents—for the very first time—a series of screenings that reframe the history of cinema in Chicago through various lenses and modes of production. This four program series illuminates the diverse factors that have shaped the filmic landscape of the region from the mid-century through the 1970s.

Form and Function: The Legacy of the Institute of Design, provides historical context and a new perspective on the lasting impact of Lászlo Moholy-Nagy’s teachings at the New Bauhaus. Two programs, The New World: Industrial, Corporate and Sponsored Film and Creative Broadcast: Communication, Commercials and Advertising, focused on industrial, commercial, sponsored, and advertising films, examine the innovative design work being done on film in the mid-century. Personal Legacies: Materiality and Abstraction, presents personal and experimental films made by the artists who worked for the design studios and corporations highlighted in the second and third programs of the series. As a whole, the series tells a chapter of Chicago’s history on film that has yet to be seen.

This series uncovers the interconnected histories of commercial and artistic film production in Chicago and, in doing so, sheds new light on the multitude of ways in which art and design industries overlapped and intersected in the city. Designed to be Seen explores the distinct genres and production models that were most dominant during this period of time and provides a new perspective on filmmaking in Chicago. It illustrates the innovative ways in which artists and designers used the moving image to both tell and sell the stories of their time.

The four screenings in the program are timed to complement other concurrent exhibitions taking place as part of the Terra Foundation’s Art Design Chicago Initiative, including those at our host venues: The Chicago Cultural Center and the Chicago History Museum. Designed to be Seen is part of Art Design Chicago, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art exploring Chicago’s art and design legacy, with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. Designed to be Seen is funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art and The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. 

Advertising agencies such as Leo Burnett have been based in Chicago since the late 19th century. Creative Broadcast: Communication, Commercials and Advertising highlights the work of a few innovative firms and designers. Program introduction and post-screening discussion: Michael Golec (Chair and Associate Professor of Art and Design History, Department of Art History, Theory & Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Films screening include:

American Republic Insurance “Eagles” (Produced by Goldsholl Design and Film Associates, directed by Tom Freese, 1975, color, sound, 12 minutes)

Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company “Schlitz Malt Liquor” (Produced by Goldsholl Design and Film Associates, 1963, color, sound, 3.5 minutes)

A.B. Dick Company “Machines” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., circa 1965, color, sound, 1 minute)

Campbell-Mithun, Inc. “Ac’cent Sales Film: The Honeymooners” (Produced by Goldsholl Design and Film Associates, circa 1971, b/w & color, sound, 4 minutes)

Satin Plus Paints “Trilogy” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., circa 1968, color, sound, 1 minute)

Alert Soap “The Perfect Bar of Soap” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1969, color, sound, 1 minute)

Purify Breath Mints “Wrestling” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1966, b/w, sound, 1 minute)

AMF “Homko Mowers” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc. for American Machine and Foundry Company, 1968, color, sound, 1 minute)

Chicago American “Trucks” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1967, color, sound, 1 minute)

Sears, Roebuck and Company “Recording Studio” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1968, color, sound, 1 minute)

Sears, Roebuck and Company “Crawling Baby Doll” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1968, color, sound, 1 minute)

United Airlines “Party” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1971, color, sound, 1 minute)

Bunker Ramo Composite (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1970s, color, sound, 5 minute excerpt)

Magazine Publishers Association “First Impression” (Produced by Goldsholl Design and Film Associates for the Magazine Publishers Association, 1965, color, 11 minutes)

Flavor-Kist Cookies “Crunch” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1967, color, sound, 1 minute)

Quaker Oats Shredded Wheat “Wager” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1968, color, sound, 1 minute)

Karoll’s Department Stores “Santa Claus” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1969, color, sound, 1 minute)

Blue Cross Blue Shield “Breakfast” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1967, b/w, sound, 1 minute)

Commonwealth Edison “A, B, C” (Produced by Goldsholl Design and Film Associates, circa 1979, color, sound, 2 minutes)

Blue Cross Blue Shield “We Need Each Other” (Produced by Mike Gray Associates, Inc., 1972, color, sound, 1 minute)

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Designed to be Seen – Personal Legacies: Materiality and Abstraction

Location:

78 East Washington Street, Chicago IL 60202
go to map

Dates:

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Hours:

6pm

Admissions:

Free

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still from Capitulation (1965)

Designed to be Seen: Art and Function in Chicago Mid-Century Film presents—for the very first time—a series of screenings that reframe the history of cinema in Chicago through various lenses and modes of production. This four program series illuminates the diverse factors that have shaped the filmic landscape of the region from the mid-century through the 1970s.

Form and Function: The Legacy of the Institute of Design, provides historical context and a new perspective on the lasting impact of Lászlo Moholy-Nagy’s teachings at the New Bauhaus. Two programs, The New World: Industrial, Corporate and Sponsored Film and Creative Broadcast: Communication, Commercials and Advertising, focused on industrial, commercial, sponsored, and advertising films, examine the innovative design work being done on film in the mid-century. Personal Legacies: Materiality and Abstraction, presents personal and experimental films made by the artists who worked for the design studios and corporations highlighted in the second and third programs of the series. As a whole, the series tells a chapter of Chicago’s history on film that has yet to be seen.

This series uncovers the interconnected histories of commercial and artistic film production in Chicago and, in doing so, sheds new light on the multitude of ways in which art and design industries overlapped and intersected in the city. Designed to be Seen explores the distinct genres and production models that were most dominant during this period of time and provides a new perspective on filmmaking in Chicago. It illustrates the innovative ways in which artists and designers used the moving image to both tell and sell the stories of their time.

The four screenings in the program are timed to complement other concurrent exhibitions taking place as part of the Terra Foundation’s Art Design Chicago Initiative, including those at our host venues: The Chicago Cultural Center and the Chicago History Museum. Designed to be Seen is part of Art Design Chicago, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art exploring Chicago’s art and design legacy, with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. Designed to be Seen is funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art and The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. 

Personal Legacies: Materiality and Abstraction focuses on more personal and experimental films made by the individuals who were simultaneously working for the studios, agencies and design firms mentioned above. Intersections of the personal and the professional are explored through films including Robert Stiegler’s Capitulation (1965); Larry Janiak’s Adams Film (1963); and Byron Grush’s Fotogrammar (1969).

Program Introduction and Post-Screening Discussion: Daniel Bashara (Adjunct Faculty, Department of Cinema and Media Studies, DePaul University)

Films screening include:

Allegro (Larry Janiak, 1960, color, sound, 3 minutes)

Traffic (Robert Stiegler, circa 1960, color, silent, 8 minutes)

Capitulation (Robert Stiegler, 1965, b/w, sound, 22 minutes)

Glasshouse (Larry Janiak, 1964, b/w, sound, 7 minutes)

Adams Film (Larry Janiak, 1963, color, sound, 12 minutes)

Fotogrammar (Byron Grush, circa 1969, color, sound, 7 minutes)

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Designed to be Seen – The New World: Industrial, Corporate and Sponsored Films

Location:

78 East Washington Street, Chicago IL 60202
go to map

Dates:

Sunday, November 4, 2018

Hours:

2:30-4pm

Admissions:

Free

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still from The New World of Stainless Steel (1960)

Designed to be Seen: Art and Function in Chicago Mid-Century Film presents—for the very first time—a series of screenings that reframe the history of cinema in Chicago through various lenses and modes of production. This four program series illuminates the diverse factors that have shaped the filmic landscape of the region from the mid-century through the 1970s.

Form and Function: The Legacy of the Institute of Design, provides historical context and a new perspective on the lasting impact of Lászlo Moholy-Nagy’s teachings at the New Bauhaus. Two programs, The New World: Industrial, Corporate and Sponsored Film and Creative Broadcast: Communication, Commercials and Advertising, focused on industrial, commercial, sponsored, and advertising films, examine the innovative design work being done on film in the mid-century. Personal Legacies: Materiality and Abstraction, presents personal and experimental films made by the artists who worked for the design studios and corporations highlighted in the second and third programs of the series. As a whole, the series tells a chapter of Chicago’s history on film that has yet to be seen.

This series uncovers the interconnected histories of commercial and artistic film production in Chicago and, in doing so, sheds new light on the multitude of ways in which art and design industries overlapped and intersected in the city. Designed to be Seen explores the distinct genres and production models that were most dominant during this period of time and provides a new perspective on filmmaking in Chicago. It illustrates the innovative ways in which artists and designers used the moving image to both tell and sell the stories of their time.

The four screenings in the program are timed to complement other concurrent exhibitions taking place as part of the Terra Foundation’s Art Design Chicago Initiative, including those at our host venues: The Chicago Cultural Center and the Chicago History Museum. Designed to be Seen is part of Art Design Chicago, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art exploring Chicago’s art and design legacy, with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. Designed to be Seen is funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art and The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. 

The New World: Industrial, Corporate and Sponsored Films brings together films produced for clients including Republic Steel, Life Magazine, Kimberly-Clark Corporation, and the Container Corporation of America that illustrate the impact of design on everyday life and product manufacturing. Films produced by Goldsholl Design Associates challenge conventions of the sponsored film through the use of experimental editing and camera techniques. Films produced for the Container Corporation of America bring us inside the company and illustrate corporate culture, values, and technological innovations. New products and manufacturing processes are showcased and the impact of good design—both on producers and consumers—is emphasized throughout the program. These corporate clients entrusted filmmakers and designers working in Chicago to breathe creative energy and life into films about subjects that don’t typically excite a general audience (the various uses of stainless steel, cardboard packaging, and a new plastic printing paper).

Program introduction and post-screening discussion: Lara Allison (Lecturer, Department of Art History, Theory and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago). Presented in partnership with the Chicago Humanities Festival. Reserve a free ticket here.

Films screening include:

The New World of Stainless Steel (Produced by Wilding Studios for Republic Steel, 1960, color, sound, 16 minutes)

CCA & You: Partners in Achievement (Produced and directed by Rhodes Patterson for the Container Corporation of America, 1976, color, sound, 5 minute excerpt)

WRAPAK: Your Packaging Answer? (Produced by Container Corporation of America, circa 1968, color, sound, 7 minutes)

Kimberly-Clark Corporation “Texoprint” (Produced by Morton Goldsholl Design Associates for Kimberly-Clark Corporation, circa 1960, color, sound, 14 minutes)

Champion Papers: Imagination 11 (Produced and directed by Morton Goldsholl for U.S. Plywood-Champion Papers, Inc., 1967, color, sound, 5 minutes)

Life Magazine “Mag” (Produced by Goldsholl Design Associates for Life Magazine, 1959, color, sound, 13 minutes)

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Chicago Home Movie Day 2018

Location:

1601 N. Clark Street
Chicago, IL
go to map

Dates:

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Hours:

11AM - 3PM

Admissions:

FREE (donations always welcome!)

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Once again, Chicago Film Archives and the Chicago Film Society join forces to present CHICAGO HOME MOVIE DAY at the Chicago History Museum.

Home movies provide invaluable records of our families and our communities: they document vanished storefronts, questionable fashions, adorable pets, long-departed loved ones, and neighborhoods-in-transition. Many Chicagoans still possess these old reels, passed down from generation to generation, but lack the projection equipment to view them properly and safely. That’s where Home Movie Day comes in: you bring the films (16mm, 8mm and/or Super 8mm), and we inspect them, project them, and offer tips on storage, preservation, and video transfer–all free of charge.

Chicago Home Movie Day is dedicated to YOUR home movies. From 11:00am until 3:00pm archivists and projectionists will inspect and project all celluloid home movies that walk in the door. We encourage providers of these gems to introduce their films to an eager HMD audience. Don’t have any films? We’ve got you covered! In the afternoon we’ll present a special program of home movies and amateur films from CFA’s collections.

HOME MOVIE DAY FAQ:

What film formats can I bring to Home Movie Day?
We can inspect and project 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8. If you have any other oddball formats (28mm, 9.5mm, etc.), we can’t project the films for you, but we can help you find a safe, cost-effective way to view these prints. You’ll also earn our undying film nerd envy.

Do I need to bring a home movie?
Nope. You’re welcome to stop by and just watch other people’s home movies. And if you’re a walking encyclopedia of forgotten Chicago landmarks, eateries, and parades, your commentary will be much appreciated!

I have a whole box of ‘em! Can we watch ‘em all?
Nobody likes a home movie hog. Bring as many films as you’d like, but we’ll be screening one reel from each participant until everyone has had a chance to see their home movies. After that, second helpings are totally fine–especially in Kodachrome.

Do I have to get up and talk about my home movies?
You’re welcome to narrate your home movies and inform everyone that this scene was shot at Aunt Bertha’s high school graduation and that this one was shot on your family trip to Florida in 1982. Or you can just sit in the auditorium and watch them in anonymous silence. Whatever floats your celluloid boat.

My home movies are very personal. Why would I want to watch them with a bunch of voyeurs?
Home movies often commemorate scenes of enormous personal importance: weddings, graduations, birthdays, family reunions. Though home movies often begin as family records with deeply private meaning, the passage of years makes them compelling to people far beyond your immediate family. They serve as authentic records of our neighborhoods, traditions, and communities. You’ll enjoy sharing them–really.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? They’re incredibly precious to me!
Nope. We’ll just inspect and project your home movies and return them to you in comparable condition. (If there are broken perforations or cracked frames, we’ll fix those and return the films in better condition!) Keep in mind that decades-old films are fragile and there’s an inherent (though slight) risk of damage during any projection. If we do not feel that the film can be safely projected, we will not screen it.

Will you take my home movies and never give them back? I don’t want ‘em anymore! (They smell funny.)
The Chicago Film Archives would be happy to discuss options for donating your old, unwanted home movies to its ever-growing collection.

This sounds amazing! How much will this expert consultation set me back?
Home Movie Day is absolutely free, but donations are welcome.

 

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HMD 2018 image designed by Lauren Caddick (www.laurencaddickdesign.com)

AMERICAN REVOLUTION 2 premiere – new 35mm preservation print!

Location:

164 North State Street
go to map

Dates:

Friday, October 26, 2018

Hours:

7:45pm

Admissions:

$11 / $6 GSFC members

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UH5ObQ7Xpc&t

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW!

We are thrilled to announce the Chicago premiere of our 2018 preservation project, American Revolution 2, at the Gene Siskel Film Center on Friday, October 26 at 7:45pm. Screening as a brand new 35mm print, this is a rare opportunity to see the film just a few blocks away from the site of the 1968 Democratic National Convention and violent protests that took place in and around Grant Park.

Although American Revolution 2 begins with footage of the explosive confrontations between the Chicago police and protestors during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, the filmmakers (Howard Alk, Mike Gray, and Bill Cottle) quickly move from these clashes to focus on conversations about power, race, and resistance that were taking place in the city. The film is a nuanced, compelling, and timely examination of the unlikely relationship that was developing between the Black Power movement in Chicago and the Young Patriots, a group of impoverished, primarily white, residents of the Uptown neighborhood who were beginning to organize around issues of social mobility, police brutality, and income inequity.

As part of our ongoing efforts to make CFA’s collections available to contemporary artists, CFA commissioned sound artist Adam Sonderberg to create a seven-minute audio prelude piece specifically for American Revolution 2 using archival material from our vault. Sonderberg’s impressionistic audio piece immediately precedes the screening and provides an alternative way to absorb and understand the political and social turmoil that defined Chicago in 1968.

This preservation project and presentation is in honor of Mike Gray and Bill Cottle of the Film Group. CFA’s friend Mike Gray passed away in 2013.

The preservation of American Revolution 2 was made possible with the generous support of the National Film Preservation Foundation and Rebuild Foundation.

“A film every Chicagoan should see … as well edited and as high in technical quality as any cinema verite documentary I’ve ever seen.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

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Arlington Heights Home Movie Day

Location:

500 N Dunton Ave, Arlington Heights, IL 60004
go to map

Dates:

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Hours:

4:30 - 7pm

Admissions:

Free!

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Chicago Film Archives is excited to be partnering with the Arlington Heights Memorial Library on the presentation of the first ever Home Movie Day in Arlington Heights! CFA staff archivists will be on site to inspect and project your 8mm, Super 8mm, and 16mm films and provide advice and recommendations about how to best care for your films in the future. We’ve hosted Chicago’s Home Movie Day for over ten years and we’re thrilled to move out into the suburbs this year!

Please visit the Arlington Heights Memorial Library website for more information about the event and call 847-392-0100 or visit ahml.info to register. Signups open from Mon, 10/01/2018 – 9:00am to Sat, 10/13/2018 – 4:30pm.

Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and local history held annually at many local venues worldwide. This is an opportunity for you and your family to share your own home movies with your community and enjoy seeing their stories as well. We provide all the screening equipment, and all you need to bring is your tape or film and a story to share. Even if you don’t wish to screen anything, you can still come to enjoy the show as an audience member!

If you wish to screen a movie, please arrive by 4:30 pm to sign up for a 5-minute time slot. Limit one submission per family, but additional submissions may be screened if time allows.

If you are bringing a video, please have your tape queued up to the appropriate starting place. Only the following formats can be screened: 8mm, Super8, 16mm, VHS, VHS-C, Video8, Hi8, Betamax, DV, and MiniDV. Not sure what kind you have? We can help you identify the different film and video formats. Call us at 847-870-5222.

Stick around after the screening to hear about how to best care for your films and learn how you can convert your home movies digital video files at the library. For more information about Home Movie Day, check out their website: http://www.centerforhomemovies.org/hmd

Presented in partnership with Chicago Film Archives and Downtown Mediaworks.

Up is Down – Exhibition Opening Talk with author Thomas Dyja

Location:

40 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston IL 60208
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Dates:

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Hours:

2pm

Admissions:

Free and open to all

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It’s been an extremely fulfilling year working with our colleagues at the Block Museum of Art to provide access to films from CFA’s Mort and Millie Goldsholl Collection for the Up Is Down: Mid-century Experiments in Advertising and Film at the Goldsholl Studio exhibition. Join us for the opening celebration at 2pm on October 6, 2018.

Author Thomas Dyja, third-generation Chicagoan and author of the award-winning Third Coast: When Chicago Built the American Dream, will discuss why Chicago was fertile ground for the Goldsholls’ work— and explore the mid-century circumstances that united culture and industry across the city. In conversation with Dyja, exhibition co-curators Amy Beste and Corinne Granof will share insight into the groundbreaking work of the Goldsholl Associates, tracing its artistic influences, including those of artist and designer László Moholy-Nagy, as well as the firms’ lasting design legacy.

The 2pm talk is preceded by an all-ages Up Is Down Hands-On Design Lab, beginning at 10:30am.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/up-is-down-exhibition-opening-talk-with-author-thomas-dyja-the-third-coast-tickets-47180973562

This exhibition and opening day is presented in conjunction with Art Design Chicago, a wide-ranging initiative to explore the breadth of Chicago’s role as a catalyst and incubator for innovations in art and design. Art Design Chicago is a spirited celebration of the unique and vital role Chicago plays as America’s crossroads of creativity and commerce. Led by the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, this citywide partnership of cultural organizations explores Chicago’s art and design legacy with more than 25 exhibitions and hundreds of events in 2018.

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ART DESIGN CHICAGO – Designed to be Seen: Art and Function in Chicago Mid-Century Film

 

 

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We’re thrilled to announce that we will be participating in the Terra Foundation for American Art’s Art Design Chicago initiative. Art Design Chicago is a spirited celebration of the unique and vital role Chicago plays as America’s crossroads of creativity and commerce. Initiated by the Terra Foundation for American Art, this citywide partnership of more than 75 cultural organizations explores Chicago’s art and design legacy and continued impact with more than 30 exhibitions, hundreds of events, as well as the creation of several scholarly publications and a four-part television series presented throughout 2018.

As part of the Art Design Chicago initiative, CFA is presenting Designed to be Seen: Art and Function in Chicago Mid-Century Film, a series of screenings that reframe the history of cinema in Chicago through various lenses and modes of production. This four program series illuminates the diverse factors that have shaped the filmic landscape of the region from the mid-century through the 1970s. Read More »

Chicago Premiere of the International Media Mixer

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The Chicago premiere of the International Media Mixer on July 17 was beyond our wildest imagination!

We couldn’t have imagined a better setting for the live performance of these stunning four works than the Jay Pritzker Pavillion. The evening was cool and clear with the lake just to the east and the glowing skyline of the city to the west. Archival images from CFA and Lab 80-Cinescatti in Italy were transformed by artists Giuseppe Boccassini, Lori Felker, Federico Francioni & Yan Cheng, and Domietta Torlasco and their sonic collaborators Alex Inglizian, Patrizia Oliva, Tomeka Reid, and Stefano Urkuma De Santis into new pieces – each of them magical, challenging, hypnotic, and deeply moving.

The project not only brought together artists working in different parts of the world to create these beautiful new films, it also drew out connections between our contemporary experience and the images that represent our history and our humanity. We already miss our Italian collaborators and friends (curator Karianne Fiorini, musicians Patrizia Oliva and Stefano Urkuma De Santis, and Gianmarco Torri) and are so thankful for the time they were able to spend with us in Chicago.

Thank you to everyone who came to the screening and to those of you who were there with us in spirit!

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US Premiere of the International Media Mixer!

Location:

201 E Randolph Street, Chicago IL 60601
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Dates:

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Hours:

6:30pm

Admissions:

Free!

Video by Cerise Films / Original Track “Birdseed” by Salvatore Córdova

Chicago Film Archives is thrilled to announce the US premiere of our International Media Mixer project, which will take place on July 17 as part of the 2018 Millennium Park Summer Film Series produced by the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events. The project is our largest and most ambitious to date – involving nine artists working in Italy and the US – and has been almost two years in the making.

Funded by the MacArthur Foundation’s “International Connections” fund, the International Media Mixer is a cross-cultural artistic exchange in which Italian artists were commissioned to make a new film using material from CFA’s collections and Chicago-based artists using footage from a regional Italian archive, Lab 80 film - Cinescatti.

The filmmakers were asked to explore, interpret and use this material—from another culture, another country and another era—as they liked. We then paired the US-based filmmakers with Italian musicians and the Italian-based filmmakers with Chicago-based musicians to create soundtracks for the new video pieces. This resulted in a truly collaborative project that brought together artists in Italy and Chicago, as well as our two regional film archives based in Chicago and Bergamo.

We are so lucky to be working with such talented artists on this project! Read more about each of them here.

Giuseppe Boccassini (IT) + Alex Inglizian (US)
Lori Felker (US) + Patrizia Oliva (IT)
Federico Francioni & Yan Cheng (IT) + Tomeka Reid (US)
Domietta Torlasco (US) + Stefano Urkuma De Santis (IT)

This project is one of 15 artistic partnerships supported by the MacArthur Foundation’s International Connections Fund.

 

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CFA at the Taste of Chicago!

Location:

235 South Columbus Drive, Chicago IL 60604
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Dates:

Wednesday, July 11 - Sunday, July 15

Hours:

11am - 9pm (Wednesday - Friday)
10am - 9pm (Saturday - Sunday)

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Still from “In the Valley of the Hudson” (Julian Gromer Collection, 1951)

This year, the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events has invited CFA to open its vault for the Taste of Chicago (July 11-15). CFA invites you to stop by the Petrillo Music Shell—not only for great music—but to see some never-before-seen films from our archives. When the music ends, the films begin. We hope to see you there!

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Everyday Resistance: Archiving Your Family History Workshop

Location:

301 E. Garfield Blvd.
Chicago, IL 60637
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Dates:

Thursday, June 28

Hours:

6:30-8:30pm

Admissions:

Free

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The South Side Home Movie Project’s archivist Candace Ming and a team of film preservationists, Brian Belak, Collections Manager and Client Services Director, Chicago Film Archives, and Dan Erdman, Archivist, Media Burn Independent Video Archive, will lead a workshop on how to care for, preserve, and catalog your family’s archival materials whether they be film, video, documents or photographs. The team will inspect, assess and make recommendations on maintaining your family’s historic records in the best conditions. Families who choose to contribute 8mm, Super-8 and 16mm films to the SSHMP archive will receive free digital copies. Complete information on donation available on-site.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/preservationworkshop

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition “Everyday Resistance: The Art of Living in Black Chicago” on view at the Arts Incubator through July 6, 2018. Home movies by amateur South Side filmmakers animate a domestic space, offering a visual record of leisure, performativity and an aesthetic of Blackness from the 1940s through the 1980s. For a complete schedule of programs, please visit: http://bit.ly/EverydayResistance.

Presented by Arts + Public Life with the South Side Home Movie Project.

Arts + Public Life, an initiative of UChicago Arts, builds creative connections on Chicago’s South Side through artist residencies, arts education, and artist-led projects and events. We envision a robust, collaborative, and meaningful relationship between the University of Chicago and the South Side’s vibrant civic, cultural, and artistic communities. Learn more at: arts.uchicago.edu/apl.

Out of the Vault: Secrets of Nature

Location:

5720 N. Ridge Avenue
Chicago IL 60660
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Dates:

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Hours:

8pm

Admissions:

Suggested donation, $8

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still from Wheels Across America  (Julian Gromer, 1968)

As spring blooms into summer, the city comes alive with the many colors of new plant life. But even though we live among and admire the foliage, our interactions with it retain an air of mystery. Do we seek to understand the plant world’s inner-workings, like nature photographer and Winnetka native John Ott (Secrets of Nature) or the alien scientists and their robot sidekick of Mission Third Planet: Green Grow the Plants? Can we take an active role in nurturing its growth, like filmmaker and gardener JoAnn Elam (Collards Garden 1985), or is there more to be learned from observing and allowing for the natural cycles of life (The Fall of Freddie the Leaf and Rebellion of the Flowers)? Mixing scientific examination with philosophical meditation, time-lapse photography with experimental animation, and educational with personal, diaristic filmmaking, this program seeks to unveil just a few of the many secrets of nature. Our Facebook event page is here & advance tickets will be available soon.

Films screening:

Secrets of Nature (1951, 16mm, b&w, sound, 6 minutes, Margaret Conneely Collection)

Part of the “Nature’s Wonderland” series, this short film celebrates the work of Dr. John Ott, the “father of photobiology,” at work inside his greenhouse studio located behind his Winnetka home. Ott helped develop and popularize time-lapse photography and full spectrum lighting. His experiments with different colored lighting systems and their effects on the health of plants eventually led to experiments with colored lights on the health of animals and humans.

Excerpts from Wheels Across America (Julian Gromer, 1968, 16mm transferred to digital, color, silent, 6 minutes, Julian Gromer Collection)

Cinematic experiments from the home studio of Elgin resident and filmmaker, Julian Gromer (1907-1986), including microscopic crystal growth (AKA micrographs) and John Ott-inspired plant movement. These portions were originally spliced into an edited travelogue following young men on a bicycle trip cross-country (San Francisco to New York City).

Mission Third Planet: Green Grow the Plants (Don Klugman, 1979, 16mm, color, sound, 15 minutes, Don Klugman Collection)

A pair of young extraterrestrial scientists, helped by charming robot Ten-ping, investigate and classify plant life on Earth while simultaneously fending off the villainous anti-science Cetillians. Written and directed by Chicago filmmaker Don Klugman.

Life Cycle of a Flowering Plant, Part 1: The Plant Cell, Male and Female Flower Parts (Don T. Schloat, 1971, 16mm, color, sound, 11 minutes, Lincoln Middle School Collection)

With bouncy music and bright animation from Don T. Schloat (also an animator for He-Man and Spider-Man, among other series), this film details the basics of asexual and sexual reproduction in plants and the names for the parts involved. Part one of a three-part series.

The Fall of Freddie the Leaf (Bernard Wilets, 1986, 16mm, color, sound, 17 minutes, Chicago Public Library Collection)

Born in the spring, Freddie the leaf revels in the excitement of living in the cool breeze and summer sun, but as the season changes to fall and all the leaves start to change color, Freddie learns to accept his natural fate. A moving allegory for all cycles of life, based on the book by Leo Buscaglia.

Collards Garden 1985 (JoAnn Elam, 1985, 8mm transferred to digital, color, silent, 8 minutes, JoAnn Elam Collection)

Part of a series of short films documenting her garden over several years, Chicago experimental filmmaker and master gardener JoAnn Elam stars in this film about growing collard greens. Her skill and love for the process is on full display as she carefully prepares the plot of land, plants each sprout, and finally harvests the fully-grown leaves for use indoors.

Rebellion of the Flowers (Millie Goldsholl, 1992, 35mm transferred to digital, color, sound, 9 minutes, Mort and Millie Goldsholl Collection)

In this animated story dedicated to “the Good People who resist the abuse of power in any form,” a gardener flaunts his control over the flowers in his garden, only to face the unexpected retaliation of his blossoming tenants. This rarely-screened 35mm short from Chicago mid-century designer Millie Goldsholl is presented in a new 2K scan created by CFA earlier this year for the Women Behind the Camera project.

Total program time: 72 minutes

Millie Goldsholl’s “Rebellion of the Flowers”

Millie Goldsholl’s Rebellion of the Flowers (1992) appears to be the last film she completed and one that she poured an incredible amount of creative passion and energy into. Completed three years before her husband’s death, the film is dedicated to “Morton Goldsholl and the Good People who resist the abuse of power in any form.” It’s easy to see Millie’s love and admiration for her husband reflected in the content of the film—in particular its emphasis on respect, humility, and equality.

Narrated by Shepard Strudwick, Rebellion of the Flowers tells the story of a gardener, Jan, who “understood nature’s needs” and worked hard to grow and care for his plants. He protected and looked after his flowers, providing them with “love and gentle care.” He took great pride in his work and, as a result of his labor, felt “filled with purpose” and “close to God.” However, Jan’s love and adoration of the flowers transforms into a distortion of his power, as he becomes jealous of the flowers bowing “under the intense authority of the sun.” Jan’s body reflects this internal transformation, and he becomes a looming totalitarian figure demanding the obedience of his flowers. Read More »