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329 West 18th Street Suite #610
Chicago, Illinois 60616
(312) 243-1808
info@chicagofilmarchives.org

16mm Projection Workshop in Chicago

Dates:

Saturday, September 21 – Sunday, September 22, 2019

Admissions:

***Registration for the workshop is now full!**

Chicago Film Archives is pleased to be hosting the Advanced 16mm Projection Workshop in collaboration with the Chicago Film Society, L’Abominable, and Process Reversal, under the banner of filmprojection21.org Read More »

MLA International Symposium in Lisbon — “Remembering Voices Lost”

Location:

Lisbon, Portugal
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Dates:

July 24, 2019

Hours:

10:30 AM

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Chicago Film Archives is proud to announce that the JoAnn Elam Collection will be the subject of a paper presented at the MLA International Symposium.

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CFA Media Mixer 2019 (in review)

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We had a fantastic time at the 8th annual Media Mixer on May 9 and are absolutely thrilled with the incredible work produced by this year’s artists! Thanks to everyone who came and participated!

If you couldn’t make it (or if you want to watch the work again!), we now have two of the pieces available to stream below. Read more about the artists here.

2019’s talented lineup (video + sound):

Brian Ashby + Bill MacKay
Emily Eddy + Natalie Chami (TALsounds)
Amir George + Lilianna Zofia Wosko

Read More »

Out of the Vault: The Somersaulter-Moats & Somersaulter Super Premiere Film Event!

Location:

5720 N. Ridge Avenue
Chicago IL 60660
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Dates:

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Hours:

7pm

Admissions:

Suggested donation, $8

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still from Yo Yo the Clone, Too (1980)

Between 1973 and 1991, JP Somersaulter and Lillian Somersaulter Moats produced over 20 animated short films for children and adults. Working under the name “Pajon Arts,” the duo developed an idiosyncratic style of image-making—from additive line drawings to stop-motion collages to watercolor celluloid animations. Their subject matter frequently deals with the human mind and creative process, which is reflected in their narrative style. Lillian and JP’s stories for adult audiences have been referred to as “Kafkaesque.” and, even at their most lighthearted and whimsical, tend to carry a sinister undertone. Their films for children include renditions of classic fairytales and imaginative original stories. Their work is influenced by their shared interests in storytelling, myth, creativity and the logic of thought.

Filmmakers JP Somersaulter, Lillian Somersaulter Moats, and Michael Moats in person!
Films screening:

The Silverfish King (1973, color, sound, 7 minutes)
JP Somersaulter’s Premiere Cartoon Cartoon (1974, color, sound, 6 minutes)
The Wizard (1974, color, sound, 8 minutes)
The Light Fantastic Picture Show (1974, color, sound, 7 minutes)
The Magic World of Whiselphasoon (1975, color, sound, 13 minutes)
Spooky Boo’s and Room Noodles (1976, color, sound, 7 minutes)
Yo Yo the Clone, Too (1980, color, sound, 4 minutes)
Katura and the Cat (1982, color, sound, 11 minutes)
JP Somersaulter’s Dot to Dot Cartoon Cartoon (1989, color, sound, 8 minutes)

TRT: 71 minutes

Tickets are available for advance purchase here.

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2019 CFA Media Mixer!

Location:

3111 N Western Avenue, Chicago, IL 60618
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Dates:

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Hours:

8:30pm

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Come see the premiere of three new works created by Chicago-based artists using footage from the Chicago Film Archives collection!

The Media Mixer project started in 2012 as a way to open up CFA’s vault of archival footage to artists working in media, and to support the creation of a new video work by pairing these visual artists with artists working with sound. At the heart of the project is a desire to give CFA’s archival collections new life through the creative interpretation of contemporary artists. As a result, three new collaborative videos will be made using footage from the Chicago Film Archives collection.

This year’s artists are (video + sound):

Brian Ashby + Bill MacKay

Emily Eddy + Natalie Chami (TALsounds)

Amir George + Lilianna Zofia Wosko

Please join us at Constellation on May 9 for the world premiere of their collaborations - performed with live audio! Tickets are available for advance purchase here.

Read More »

Out of the Vault: How We Work

Location:

5720 N. Ridge Avenue
Chicago IL 60660
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Dates:

Saturday, April 27, 2019

Hours:

7pm

Admissions:

Suggested donation, $8

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still from Loretta Smith’s Where Did You Get That Woman? (1982)

This selection of films explores the struggles and hopes of women as they reflect on the relationship between power, gender, and labor in their working lives. Experimental filmmaker JoAnn Elam’s Chocolate Cake documents the process of making a cake… with an unexpected ending. Jim Klein, Julia Reichert, and Miles Mogulescu’s Union Maids focuses on the stories of three women—Kate Hyndman, Stella Nowicki and Sylvia Woods—as they recount the struggles, obstacles, and triumphs they experienced as laborers and union organizers in Chicago in the 1920s and 1930s. Loretta Smith’s Where Did You Get That Woman? follows seventy-year old Joan Williams, a bathroom attendant working on Rush Street, as she goes about her day-to-day work and reflects on her family history. Filmmaker Loretta Smith in person.

Films screening:

Chocolate Cake (JoAnn Elam, circa 1973, color, silent, 4 minutes, digital scan of 8mm original)

Union Maids (Jim Klein, Julia Reichert, Miles Mogulescu, 1976, 51 minutes, b&w, sound, new digital restoration provided courtesy of Jim Klein)

Where Did You Get That Woman? (Loretta Smith, 1982, color, sound, 30 minutes, 16mm)

Total run time: 85 minutes

Tickets are available for advance purchase here.

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The Morrison-Shearer Foundation gifts their dance media collection to Chicago Film Archives

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Sybil Shearer performing in Early Northbrook (circa 1956)

Chicago Film Archives is enormously pleased to announce the gifting of the Morrison-Shearer Foundation dance media collection to CFA. Our relationship with the Trustees and staff at the Foundation has been lengthy and has deepened considerably over the past ten years. Our combined inquiry, research, conservation work and collaboration has culminated in a profound mutual respect not only for the works in the collection, but for the interests, expertise and passions of all the individuals at both the Morrison-Shearer Foundation and Chicago Film Archives.

The Morrison-Shearer Foundation collection is comprised of unique and original film materials that reflect the artistry of photographer/filmmaker Helen Balfour Morrison and choreographer/dancer, Sybil Shearer. As a young dancer, Shearer dwelled deeply and thoroughly in the modernist dance movement taking shape in New York City, but began to forge her own creative path, pushing choreographic boundaries in new directions. In 1942 she moved to Chicago to teach and work close to nature, preferring the wide-open Midwest environment. It was here that she met the photographer Helen Balfour Morrison who became Shearer’s artistic collaborator. Morrison became skilled in using the motion camera not only to document Shearer’s work, but also to respond to and harmonize with the dancer she filmed. Read More »

CFA Media Mixer 2019: Meet this Year’s Artists

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We’re so thrilled to announce the amazing lineup of artists participating in this year’s CFA Media Mixer event. Now in its eighth year (!!!), the Media Mixer has grown to be one of CFA’s most anticipated and exciting public programs. The project began in 2012 as a way to open up our vault of archival footage to Chicago-based contemporary artists, and to support the creation of a new video work by pairing visual artists with artists working with sound. At the heart of the Media Mixer is a desire to give our archival collections new life through the creative interpretation of a new generation of makers.

This year’s artists are (video + sound):

Brian Ashby + Bill MacKay

Emily Eddy + Natalie Chami (TALsounds)

Amir George + Lilianna Zofia Wosko

Please join us at Constellation on May 9 for the world premiere of their collaborations - performed with live audio!

Tickets are available for advance purchase here.

Read More »

Citizen with Camera: South Side Civic Engagement Through Home Movies

Location:

4927 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago IL 60615
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Dates:

Saturday, April 6, 2019

Hours:

1-3pm

Admissions:

Free!

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Join us for an afternoon celebrating the residents and filmmakers of Chicago’s South Side. Watch home movies from 1960s-70s Chicago and learn about documenting daily life on the South Side of the city. CFA staff will join the South Side Home Movie Project to provide DIY tips on preserving your home movies!

This program is part of the mobile CitizenSHIP programming series taking place in and around Chicago.

2019 Benefit with Tom Palazzolo & Rick Kogan

Location:

1040 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611
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Dates:

Friday, March 22, 2019

Hours:

6pm - 9:30pm

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You are cordially invited to the Chicago Film Archives’ annual benefit at The Carlyle Ballroom on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile.

Please join Chicago legends Rick Kogan of the Chicago Tribune and documentary filmmaker Tom Palazzolo for an evening of cinema, conversation, cocktails, and cuisine that will support the preservation and exhibition of our city’s history and culture on film.

“There is not, and has never been, a filmmaker as sensitively attuned to the ways and wonders of Chicago as Tom Palazzolo. He’s been at it for decades and is a genius to cherish.” -Rick Kogan, Chicago Tribune

Where: The Carlyle Ballroom
1040 North Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois, 60611

When: Friday, March 22, 2019
6:00pm-9:30pm

6:00pm - 6:45pm   Reception– Cocktails and raffle purchases
6:45pm - 7:30pm   Buffet Dinner
7:30pm – 9:00pm   Program with host Rick Kogan and filmmaker Tom Palazzolo, screening of a new film by Tom Palazzolo, raffle drawing and live auction

Tickets: $175 or $300 a couple

Dress: Business Casual

For tickets contact: 312-243-1808 or info@chicagofilmarchives.org.

This benefit will raise much needed funding to help run Chicago’s only independent regional film archive. For over fifteen years, CFA has worked to identify, collect, preserve, and exhibit Chicago’s rich history and culture on film. Today the organization houses over 150 collections and more than 27,000 films. Join us as we celebrate these unique and extraordinary moving images—films that reflect our lives in the 20th century!

This year’s live auction prize is also unique and extraordinary … it’s Tom Palazzolo!

LIVE AUCTION

FILMMAKER TOM PALAZZOLO WILL CREATE A 20-MINUTE DOCUMENTARY OR ESSAY FILM ABOUT ANY PERSONAL OR FAMILY OCCASION THE WINNER WOULD LIKE.

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This film might document a family celebration, a reunion, a day-in-the-life of…, a child’s first day of school, or the opening of a start-up business. No matter what the occasion, the film will assuredly carry the distinct Palazzolo perspective on life. In addition, once completed, the lucky winner will get the opportunity to screen their newly made film at the Chicago Filmmakers’ firehouse theater.

Approximate value: Priceless (Proxy bidder can be arranged)

Please contact CFA for further parameters that will accompany the production of this film such as a limit on the number of shooting days or the geographical area where the film will be shot.

RAFFLE PRIZES ($25 per ticket)

Raffle tickets can be bought from CFA Board members or by contacting the CFA office at 312-243-1808 or info@chicagofilmarchives.org.

A SELECTION OF FINE WINE FROM THE CELLAR OF ONE OF CFA’S BOARD MEMBERS-
TWELVE BOTTLES, A “MIXED CASE”

Wine Bottles On Shelves In Cellar

Between 29 and 37 years old, and properly cellared since release, all twelve bottles will need to be properly decanted before serving. Each bottle would retail for between $70 and $250, if available.
- Vaillon, Chablis 1er Cru, Grand vin Blanc de Bourgogne, 1982 – 2 bottles
- Gran Reserva 904, La Rioja Alta, 1983 – 3 bottles
- Cabreo, Vino Rosso, Ruffino, “Super Tuscan,” 1990 – 2 bottles
- Le Cigare Volant, Red Wine, Bonny Doon, 1987 - 2 bottles
- Chateau Talbot, Saint Julian Grand Cru, 1987 – 3 bottles
Approximate value $1500

GIRL & THE GOAT HOP FOR FOUR

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Begin your Goat Hop for four at Duck Duck Goat, where you will have a drink at the bar and sample dishes of Executive Chef Stephanie Izard. Next, hop to Girl & the Goat, where you will receive another round of drinks at the bar and sample more of Chef Izard’s dishes. End your meal at Little Goat Diner, where you will enjoy a dessert and a nightcap. Izard’s renowned restaurant Girl & the Goat opened in Summer 2010. Little Goat Diner opened across the street just a few years later, and then Duck Duck Goat around the corner on Fulton Market in 2016. Girl & the Goat was nominated best new restaurant by the James Beard Foundation in 2011 and Izard won the Beard award for Best Chef Great Lakes in 2013. She was also named one of Food & Wine Magazine’s “Best New Chefs” in 2010.

The winners of these prizes are not required to attend the Benefit. Raffle tickets can be bought from CFA Board members or at the CFA office. If you cannot be in attendance but would like to bid on the Tom Palazzolo film production at the live auction, CFA will arrange for a proxy bidder to bid on your behalf.

CFA is proud to serve signature cocktails generously provided by Heaven’s Door, an award-winning collection of handcrafted American whiskeys developed in partnership with Bob Dylan.

 

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Out of the Vault: Funny You Should Mention…

Location:

5720 N. Ridge Avenue
Chicago IL 60660
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Dates:

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Hours:

7pm

Admissions:

Suggested donation, $8

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still from Don Klugman’s You’re Putting Me On (1969)

This selection of short films made between 1967 and 1970 by Robert Flaxman and Don Klugman capture a unique moment in Chicago’s history in which the music, comedy, and independent filmmaking scenes overlapped in hip Old Town.

Post-screening Q&A with filmmakers Robert Flaxman (via phone) and Don Klugman (in person)!

Tickets are available for advance purchase here.

Who (Robert Flaxman, 1967, 7 minutes)

I’ve Got This Problem (Don Klugman, 1966, 8.5 minutes)

You’re Putting Me On (Don Klugman, 1969, 16 minutes)

The Gospel According to Ralph Williams (Robert Flaxman, 1969, 8 minutes)

Second City “PTA Meeting” (Robert Flaxman, 1970, 10 minutes)

TRT: 50 minutes

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Body + Camera 2019: The Un/Certain Body

Location:

888 Newark Avenue, Jersey City, NJ 07306
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Dates:

Saturday, January 26, 2019

Hours:

11AM–5PM

Admissions:

This event is free and open to the public.

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still image from Life and Film (Larry Janiak in collaboration with Robert Stiegler and Jeffrey Pasco, 1965)

CFA has programmed a selection of films from our collections that will screen as part of Mana Contemporary’s Body + Camera festival. CFA’s program and a complete list of events is available here.

In partnership with Chicago Dancemakers Forum and Montom Arts, Body + Camera presents a broad spectrum of contemporary work in experimental, dance, and performance film, and includes special thematic screenings. This dynamic forum celebrates the intersection between the moving body and the moving image, focusing on risk-taking and independent artists, and featuring contemporary experimental projects that stretch mediums to their edge.

2018’s submissions, which span more than 25 countries of origin, convey an uncertain mood; underlying many of them are dilemmas around the context, purpose, and boundaries of the human form. These works illuminate some of the ways in which we struggle to understand corporeal existence in the context of a fluctuating world shaped by mercurial technologies, political absurdity, and grave environmental shifts. It is from within and without the boundaries of this complex reality that this year’s event finds its sentiment and title: The Un/Certain Body.

Featuring more than forty short films by emerging and established artists from around the world, Body + Camera will travel to Mana Contemporary Miami and Chicago later this year.

A look back at CFA’s public programs in 2018

2018 was a year marked by tremendous growth and development for CFA. Our mission to collect, preserve, and exhibit films that represent the history and culture of our region was evident in exhibitions, screenings, and programs that were as vibrant, diverse and unique as our collections. With public programs at the Jay Pritzker Pavilion, the Chicago Cultural Center, and the Chicago History Museum, and CFA’s films featured prominently in the exhibitions Up is Down: Mid-century Experiments in Advertising and Film at the Goldsholl Studio at the Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University and Never a Lovely So Real: Photography and Film in Chicago, 1950-1980 at the Art Institute of Chicago, CFA reached new heights in terms of visibility and outreach. We feel humbled and honored to have worked with so many dedicated artists and organizations over the last year.

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Up is Down: Mid-century Experiments in Advertising and Film at the Goldsholl Studio

Location:

40 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston IL 60208
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Dates:

ONGOING: September 18 - December 9, 2018

Admissions:

Free and open to all

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It’s been an extremely fulfilling year working with the Block Museum of Art to provide access to numerous films from CFA’s Mort and Millie Goldsholl Collection that are the centerpiece of the exhibition Up is Down: Mid-century Experiments in Advertising and Film at the Goldsholl Studio. Up Is Down is the first major exhibition to explore the trailblazing work of mid-twentieth century artists/designers/filmmakers Morton and Millie Goldsholl (Morton, 1911–1995; Millie 1920–2012) and their Chicago-area advertising firm, Goldsholl Design Associates.

In the 1950s, Chicago-based design firm Goldsholl and Associates made a name for itself with innovative “designs-in-film.” Headed by Morton and Millie Goldsholl, the studio produced television spots, films, trademarks, corporate identities, and print advertisements for international corporations like Kimberly-Clark, Motorola, and 7-Up. Although they were compared to some of the most celebrated design firms of the day, the Goldsholls and their designers are relatively unknown today. Opening in September 2018, the Block Museum’s exhibition Up is Down: Mid-Century Experimentation in Advertising and Film at the Goldsholl Studio will reexamine the innovative work of Goldsholl and Associates and its national impact.

The Goldsholls attended Chicago’s Institute of Design (ID) and were inspired by ID’s founder, the artist and designer László Moholy-Nagy. The curriculum at ID included motion picture production, which Moholy-Nagy viewed as a medium of light and collage. Deeply influenced by Moholy-Nagy’s teachings and Bauhaus approach, with its ethos of aesthetic experimentation and social engagement, Morton and Millie fostered a similar attitude among designers working in their firm. Their work in film grew equally out of the unique moving image and design culture of Chicago. At midcentury, Chicago was known as the “Hollywood” for educational film production, churning out thousands of educational and promotional films each year. Filmmakers worked expansively—producing slide shows, short films, and spectacular industry installations, in addition to print advertising and other ephemera. The creative work these artists pursued often influenced their commercial productions and vice versa.

Featuring films, television ads, and other kinds of moving images alongside designed objects, print advertisements, trademarks, photographs, and drawings, Up is Down will be the first exhibition to illuminate the distinctive brand of motion pictures that Chicago became known for in mid-century and the ways the city served as an influential testing ground for ideas connecting art, industry, design, and film. The exhibition, its related publication, and public programs will provide context for understanding Chicago as a unique site for ideas connecting art, design, and film that eventually gained international currency.

Up Is Down is curated at the Block Museum of Art by Amy Beste PhD, Director of Public Programs at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (and CFA Board Member), and Corinne Granof, PhD, Curator at Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University.

RELATED EVENTS

Up Is Down Opening: Hands-On Design Lab
Saturday, October 6, 10:30am

Up Is Down – Exhibition Opening Talk with Author Thomas Dyja, The Third Coast
Saturday, October 6, 2pm

Ellen Lupton: Design is Art That People Use
Wednesday, October 24, 6pm

Politics of the Studio: Race and Design in Mid-Century America
Thursday, November 1, 6pm

See the Light: Inside the Exhibition “Up Is Down”
Wednesday, November 7, 6pm

This exhibition is presented in conjunction with Art Design Chicago, a wide-ranging initiative to explore the breadth of Chicago’s role as a catalyst and incubator for innovations in art and design. Art Design Chicago is a spirited celebration of the unique and vital role Chicago plays as America’s crossroads of creativity and commerce. Led by the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, this citywide partnership of cultural organizations explores Chicago’s art and design legacy with more than 25 exhibitions and hundreds of events in 2018.

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Designed to be Seen – Form and Function: The Legacy of the Institute of Design

Location:

1601 North Clark Street, Chicago IL 60614
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Dates:

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Hours:

6pm

Admissions:

Free

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still from Experimental and Commercial Films (Mort’s Nomiya Experiments) (1956)

Designed to be Seen: Art and Function in Chicago Mid-Century Film presents—for the very first time—a series of screenings that reframe the history of cinema in Chicago through various lenses and modes of production. This four program series illuminates the diverse factors that have shaped the filmic landscape of the region from the mid-century through the 1970s.

Form and Function: The Legacy of the Institute of Design, provides historical context and a new perspective on the lasting impact of Lászlo Moholy-Nagy’s teachings at the New Bauhaus. Two programs, The New World: Industrial, Corporate and Sponsored Film and Creative Broadcast: Communication, Commercials and Advertising, focused on industrial, commercial, sponsored, and advertising films, examine the innovative design work being done on film in the mid-century. Personal Legacies: Materiality and Abstraction, presents personal and experimental films made by the artists who worked for the design studios and corporations highlighted in the second and third programs of the series. As a whole, the series tells a chapter of Chicago’s history on film that has yet to be seen.

This series uncovers the interconnected histories of commercial and artistic film production in Chicago and, in doing so, sheds new light on the multitude of ways in which art and design industries overlapped and intersected in the city. Designed to be Seen explores the distinct genres and production models that were most dominant during this period of time and provides a new perspective on filmmaking in Chicago. It illustrates the innovative ways in which artists and designers used the moving image to both tell and sell the stories of their time.

The four screenings in the program are timed to complement other concurrent exhibitions taking place as part of the Terra Foundation’s Art Design Chicago Initiative, including those at our host venues: The Chicago Cultural Center and the Chicago History Museum. Designed to be Seen is part of Art Design Chicago, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art exploring Chicago’s art and design legacy, with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. Designed to be Seen is funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art and The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation. 

Form and Function: The Legacy of the Institute of Design, provides historical context and a new perspective on the lasting impact of Lászlo Moholy-Nagy’s teachings at the New Bauhaus. Program Introduction and Post-Screening Discussion: Jan Tichy (Associate Professor, Department of Photography and Department of Art & Technology, School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Films screening include:

Eastman Kodak Company “Worth How Many Words” (Produced by Goldsholl Design and Film Associates for the Eastman Kodak Company, 1968, color, sound, 9 minutes)

Experimental and Commercial Films (Morton & Millie Goldsholl, John Weber, Fred Nomiya, 1956, color, silent, 4.5 minute excerpt)

Lens Distortion #10 (Goldsholl Design and Film Associates, circa 1971, color, silent, 3 minutes)

Lens Distortion (Original) (Goldsholl Design and Film Associates, circa 1969, color, silent, 2 minute excerpt)

IIT (Charles Dee Sharp, circa 1972, color, sound, 16 minutes)

Crescent Cardboard Company “Edge of a Line” (Produced by Goldsholl Design and Film Associates, 1976, color, sound, 8 minutes)

Magazine Publishers Association “The Meeting Place” (James W. Strongin & Morton Goldsholl, circa 1966, color, sound, 16 minutes)

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